Robert Christgau: Dean of American Rock Critics

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Consumer Guide Album

Shalamar: Three for Love [Solar, 1980]
In which these Soul Train-trained pretty-boy/girl teen-throbs make good every which way on the commercial breakthrough of 1979's Big Fun. Including commercially, of course--more hits than Dick Griffey could fit into a release schedule here. Hits subclassification "soul," I mean--as in "black," or "r&b," or should we just say "race music"? Or "not pop"? Which is pretty weird, since the album's theme song ought to be the finale, "Pop Along Kid"--pop as in the kind of music it is, and also as in what their funk does. It pops, as in "popping bass" and "finger-pop." Griffey, who understands the marketplace far better than I, hasn't put it on his release schedule. A-