Robert Christgau: Dean of American Rock Critics

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The Prodigy

  • Experience [Elektra, 1992] **
  • Music for the Jilted Generation [Mute, 1995] A
  • The Fat of the Land [Maverick/Warner Bros., 1997] *
  • Invaders Must Die [Take Me to the Hospital, 2009] **

Consumer Guide Reviews:

Experience [Elektra, 1992]
assaults get irritating sometimes, sense of humor or no sense of humor ("Jericho") **

Music for the Jilted Generation [Mute, 1995]
They acted so stupid when I caught them opening for Moby that I passed off their Mercury Prize as techno tokenism. Nor was I impressed by the failed ad campaign of a title, or the picture of a longhair defending the chasm between big bad city and vernal rave with a stiff finger and a big knife. But this is stupid in the very best way. The style of sensationalism is fireworks display--pinwheels and Roman candles and starbursts popping out of starbursts popping out of rockets midair. Sound effects too, of course--breaking glass is a favorite--and even ideas involving melody if not harmony, including a flute solo. One of the rare records that's damn near everything you want cheap music to be, and without a singer on the premises. A

The Fat of the Land [Maverick/Warner Bros., 1997]
smack them up, they deserve it, but they still got the beats ("Mindfields," "Funky Shit") *

Invaders Must Die [Take Me to the Hospital, 2009]
Weird thing--at the proper historical distance, good rave and good punk provide the same cheap thrill ("Thunder," "Invaders Must Die"). **