Robert Christgau: Dean of American Rock Critics

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Pearl Harbour

  • Don't Follow Me, I'm Lost Too [Warner Bros., 1981] B+

Consumer Guide Reviews:

Don't Follow Me, I'm Lost Too [Warner Bros., 1981]
The rockabilly that Clash/Dury factotum Mickey Gallagher gets out of Pearl's anonymous sidepeople is crude and often a little leaden. But beyond the rare genius singer (Elvis, Jerry Lee) or player (Charlie Burton, Jerry Lee), rockabilly was always more attitude than fillip anyway, and for all their slap-bass oomph and sly guitar modernisms, I think the main reason the oft-praised Stray Cats like the style is that it lets them cover the borderline-racist "Ubangi Stomp." It's a little different when this half-Filipino woman--that's g-u-r-l, boys--resurrects "Filipino Baby" and "Fujiyama Mama" and then adds her own songs about sex manuals, fear of dentists, and "Everybody's Boring but My Baby." I mean, I do believe that's a punk chip on her shoulder, which in 1981 is the kind of wood I want to knock on. B+