Robert Christgau: Dean of American Rock Critics

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Duane Allman

  • An Anthology [Capricorn, 1972] B+

Consumer Guide Reviews:

An Anthology [Capricorn, 1972]
If Duane qualified as auteur, whatever that means, then he was the auteur-as-sideman. Over four sides (nineteen cuts, fifteen available elsewhere) he takes one vocal, contributes one original composition, and reserves his most definitive playing for other people's sessions--listen again to Boz Scaggs's "Loan Me a Dime," not to mention the overlays Clapton got out of him on "Layla." Since Duane's only concept was the open-ended jam that so many session players mistake for artistic fulfillment, this is just as well; any format that limits the Brothers to four-minute tracks has much to recommend it. It doesn't result in very coherent albums, though. For scholars and acolytes. B+