Robert Christgau: Dean of American Rock Critics

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J.B. Hutto & the Hawks

  • Hawk Squat! [Delmark, 1968] A-
  • Slidewinder [Delmark, 1973] B-

See Also:

Consumer Guide Reviews:

Hawk Squat! [Delmark, 1968]
Hutto is not an original guitarist, but he is incisive enough, and his singing is harsh and authoritative. Captures a lot of the spirit of Chicago blues, and it really moves. A-

Slidewinder [Delmark, 1973]
Hutto boogies easy as falling off a barstool--he's kept my body interested in a slide solo for fifteen minutes at a time. So I had hopes he'd be one artist who'd thrive in a four-songs-per-side format. But compared to 1968's six-songs-per-side Hawk Squat!--with Sunnyland Slim's keyboards and Maurice McIntyre's sax filling in the sound--this is pretty slack. B-