Robert Christgau: Dean of American Rock Critics

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David S. Ware

  • Third Ear Recitation [DIW, 1993] Neither
  • Flight of I [Columbia/DIW, 1994] **
  • Surrendered [Columbia, 2000] A-

See Also:

Consumer Guide Reviews:

Third Ear Recitation [DIW, 1993] Neither

Flight of I [Columbia/DIW, 1994]
eso blowing sessions and pop beatdowns from the grandest, breathiest sax ever to come out of a loft ("Aquarian Sound," "There Will Never Be Another You," "Infi-Rhythms #1") **

Surrendered [Columbia, 2000]
Although I don't keep tabs on postpunk's favorite free saxophonist, this is much the most confident of the three albums I know. With virtuosity and ease, he and a quartet balanced by pianist Matthew Shipp naturalize the sturm und drang of the post-Coltrane '60s. It's got a pulse, it's got a voice, it's got some heads. It's got unflagging energy. So what's to be scared of? A little noise? A-