Robert Christgau: Dean of American Rock Critics

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Prince and the New Power Generation

  • Diamonds and Pearls [Paisley Park, 1991] **
  • [File Under Prince] [Paisley Park, 1992] A-

See Also:

Consumer Guide Reviews:

Diamonds and Pearls [Paisley Park, 1991]
doesn't know his own new power ("Willing and Able," "Jughead," "Cream") **

[File Under Prince] [Paisley Park, 1992]
Designed to prove his utter inexhaustibility in the wake of Diamonds and Pearls, by some stroke of commerce his best-selling album since Purple Rain, this absurdly designated "rock soap opera" (is he serious? is he ever? is he ever not?) proves mainly that he's got the funk. I confess I'm too square to regale the guests at my all-ages dance party with "Sexy M.F.," a title extended to six syllables in its recorded version. But "My Name Is Prince" clears up a question posed by the title, a rune available on floppy disc to any publication willing to take his guff. And "Blue Light," a ballad that's got the reggae, is a sexy motherfucker. A-